Cryptocurrency Mining on the Raspberry Pi - Electromaker.io

Raspberry Pi Bitcoin Miner Host Kit "Plug and Mine" Easy - I CAN MAKE THESE, should I compete and sell them online???

Raspberry Pi Bitcoin Miner Host Kit submitted by frankenmint to BitcoinMining [link] [comments]

Where can you actually SPEND dogecoins? [Please Add on]

When trying to explain dogecoin to people for the first time, the #1 question I get is "Yeah but, can you actually use it to buy things?"
One of the major things that will take Dogecoin to the moon will be people actually using the Ð. For a currency to gain legitimacy, it's got to be spendable. The good news is, there are sites popping up that take the Ð! Some sites also list other sites that take the Ð and serve as directories. Considering how great this community is and how quickly we are growing, the number of transactions and using Ð as real money could really make the difference!

~ ~ ~ Dogecoin Stuff ~ ~ ~

CoinOK - Various Dogecoin Articles cocomfy - Various Dogecoin Articles DogeWow - Dogecoin Shirts KawaiiCrypto - Dogecoin/Crypto Stickers Shibe Mint - Physical Dogecoins

~ ~ ~ Clothing ~ ~ ~

BedlamThreadz - Shirts, Caps and Accessories BitDials - Luxury Watches, Jewelry, Bags etc. ClockworkCrypto - Crypto Clothes and merch CrownLifestyle - Beach Articles, Bikinis, Swimsuits, Towels etc. CryptoBantam - Crypto Clothes Cryptoish - Crypto Shirts CryptoShopper - Crypto Clothes and merch CryptoVerge - Bitcoin Shirts CypherMarket - Crypto Shirts, Bags and Mugs Eat Me Clothing - Huge Clothing Sortiment Encrypted Apparel - Crypto Clothes Frank & Beans - Underwear HippTee - Crypto Shirts KALEIDOO - Vintage Clothing Kryptoez - Socks Krypto Threadz - Crypto Clothes MyCoconutHeart - Women Clothes MyCryptoGear - Crypto Clothes ParkAndFinch - Glasses Print-Ted - Crypto merchandise collection and Design your own shirt Sakama - Leather Jackets & handknotted rugs The DOTA scene - DOTA Merchandise WhaleApparel - Crypto Clothes

~ ~ ~ Donating ~ ~ ~

Animal Neotropical - D5ivRQwT4TU8CEjNBhorpMKSe8bVkMYURQ archive.org - via changelly DogecoinSocksForTheHomeless - 9vnaTWu71XWimFCW3hctSxryQgYg7rRZ7y Doge4FAH - DUCKvJPNT16USvJmWWEwchZpRVHZwm4zRW Immunity Project - DMx7wPZ5ppZDEDWr1XSrpMdMRbGH7LXs97 Kamikaze Comics - DC8Tuid8X3Qwnpo5cvBum19w2LRWXfepqr Onwadan Foundation - via coinpayments.net Tor Project - DGvn1HLeMaCZEZZYUeBWBhUCJiS2hjzbGd

~ ~ ~ Food ~ ~ ~

35North - Extra Virgin Olive Oil Blockchain Coffee - Coffee DrApis - Raw Portuguese Bee Honey HODL Fuel - Coffee and Merch PexPeppers - Hot Sauces SaffronStore - Saffron

~ ~ ~ Gaming ~ ~ ~

8BitDo - French Retro Products Allgamer - Game Servers CJS CD Keys - Steam/Origin/Uplay Games/Keys Gamesonly.at - Steam/Origin/Uplay Games/Keys Keys4Coins - Steam/Origin/Uplay Games/Keys MMOGA - Steam/Origin/Uplay Games/Keys SimRai - Game Servers

~ ~ ~ Gift Cards ~ ~ ~

Bidali - Various Gift Cards Bitrefill - 750+ Gift Cards CoinCards - Huge Selection of Gift Cards GiftOff - Gift Cards

~ ~ ~ Smoking ~ ~ ~

101Vape - Vape Products Frontier Vapor - Vape Accessories RX Vape - Vape Products Vape Crypto - Vape Products VapePENstore - Vape Products Vaposhop - Vape Products Vapour Depot - Vape Products

~ ~ ~ Tech Stores ~ ~ ~

ArgoMall - Philippine Online Tech Store, Smartphones, TVs, Laptops, etc. DS Tec - Spanish Online Tech Store Ecosystems - Huge selection of Tech Articles FastTech - Wide Variety of Tech Articles

~ ~ ~ Traveling ~ ~ ~

Bitcoin.travel - Flight and Hotel Booking Greitai - Lithuanian Travel Site with Flight and Hotel Booking MoreStamps - Flight and Hotel Booking Travala - Hotel Booking Trippki - Hotel Booking

~ ~ ~ VPN/Proxy ~ ~ ~

AzireVPN - VPN BlackVPN - VPN CactusVPN - VPN DeepWebVPN - VPN HideMy.name - VPN PureVPN - VPN SaferVPN - VPN Surfshark - VPN TorGuard - VPN

~ ~ ~ Web Hosting ~ ~ ~

97cents - Web Hosting AbacoHosting - Web Hosting CoinHost - Web Hosting CryptoCloudHosting - Web Hosting Flokinet - Web Hosting HosterBox - Web Hosting Host Havoc - Web Hosting & Game Servers Hosting.co.uk - Web Hosting Hostinger - Web Hosting Hostsailor - Web Hosting Hostwinds - Web Hosting Motov - Web Hosting Privex - Private Cloud Hosting Snel - VPS THCservers - Web Hosting QHoster - Web Hosting

~ ~ ~ Misc ~ ~ ~

247bits - Crypto Cold Storage Cards AlmightyBoost - All Natural Male Testosterone Booster BitCars - Luxury Cars and Oldtimers BitStickers - Cryptocurrency Stickers BitStore - General Store with option to pay literally everything you want online with Dogecoin BlockchainAdventures - "Toshi to the moon" book and merch BP Fragrance - Dutch perfumes shop Bullion79 - Gold Coins, Gold Bars, etc. CleanItSupply - Cleaning Supplies Coinvibe - Crypto Merch CryptoArt - Crypto Art CryptoContactLenses - Contact Lenses CryptoLife - Crypto Merch CryptoMined - Crypto Mining Equipment Crypto Posters - Crypto Posters, shirts, hats, phone cases CryptoUniverse - Crypto Mining Equipment GPS Tracking Made Easy - Easy & Simple GPS Tracker Kits Jobgate - Job Market payed with Dogecoins Lue's House of International Decor - Decor Articles Lynx Art Collection - Art MobiSun - Solar Panels, Power Banks, Solar Generators Molecule Store - Various Articles about molecules Olympian Bitcoin - Crypto Merch Peername - Blockchain-Based Domain Names Pi-Supply - Raspberry Pi and accessories ShopOfThings - Electronic Tech Parts SugarTrends - Huge local stores online marketplace ThaiBaM - Coffee, Tea, Oils, Balms etc. TormentBox - Various prank articles like glitter letters etc. WikiLeaks Shop - Official Shirts, Mugs, Stickers, Posters, etc.
Disclaimer:

All links are provided with the best of my knowledge.Please make sure to check the shops listed here yourself again, before spending your Dogecoins there.In no way should the admin of this website be responsible for any fraudulently activities from any listed shop.

Thanks to Dimi for the links
DimiFWDonate: D62WT9ebWbVW8QtBE57TE8CUaH3s95T3dN
📷
submitted by SoiledCold5 to dogecoin [link] [comments]

Best $100-$300 FPGA development board in 2018?

Hello, I’ve been trying to decide on a FPGA development board, and have only been able to find posts and Reddit threads from 4-5 years ago. So I wanted to start a new thread and ask about the best “mid-range” FGPA development board in 2018. (Price range $100-$300.)
I started with this Quora answer about FPGA boards, from 2013. The Altera DE1 sounded good. Then I looked through the Terasic DE boards.
Then I found this Reddit thread from 2014, asking about the DE1-SoC vs the Cyclone V GX Starter Kit: https://www.reddit.com/FPGA/comments/1xsk6w/cyclone_v_gx_starter_kit_vs_de1soc_board/‬ (I was also leaning towards the DE1-SoC.)
Anyway, I thought I better ask here, because there are probably some new things to be aware of in 2018.
I’m completely new to FPGAs and VHDL, but I have experience with electronics/microcontrollers/programming. My goal is to start with some basic soft-core processors. I want to get some C / Rust programs compiling and running on my own CPU designs. I also want to play around with different instruction sets, and maybe start experimenting with asynchronous circuits (e.g. clock-less CPUs)
Also I don’t know if this is possible, but I’d like to experiment with ternary computing, or work with analog signals instead of purely digital logic. EDIT: I just realized that you would call those FPAAs, i.e. “analog” instead of “gate”. Would be cool if there was a dev board that also had an FPAA, but no problem if not.
EDIT 2: I also realized why "analog signals on an FPGA" doesn't make any sense, because of how LUTs work. They emulate boolean logic with a lookup table, and the table can only store 0s and 1s. So there's no way to emulate a transistor in an intermediate state. I'll just have play around with some transistors on a breadboard.
UPDATE: I've put together a table with some of the best options:
Board Maker Chip LUTs Price SoC? Features
icoBoard Lattice iCE40-HX8K 7,680 $100 Sort of A very simple FPGA development board that plugs into a Raspberry Pi, so you have a "backup" hard-core CPU that can control networking, etc. Supports a huge range of pmod accessories. You can write a program/circuit so that the Raspberry Pi CPU and the FPGA work together, similar to a SoC. Proprietary bitstream is fully reverse engineered and supported by Project IceStorm, and there is an open-source toolchain that can compile your hardware design to bitstream. Has everything you need to start experimenting with FPGAs.
iCE40-HX8K Breakout Board Lattice iCE40-HX8K-CT256 7,680 $49 No 8 LEDs, 8 switches. Very similar to icoBoard, but no Raspberry Pi or pmod accessories.
iCE40 UltraPlus Lattice iCE40 UltraPlus FPGA 5280 $99 No Chip specs. 4 switchable FPGAs, and a rechargeable battery. Bluetooth module, LCD Display (240 x 240 RGB), RGB LED, microphones, audio output, compass, pressure, gyro, accelerometer.
Go Board Lattice ICE40 HX1K FPGA 1280 $65 No 4 LEDs, 4 buttons, Dual 7-Segment LED Display, VGA, 25 MHz on-board clock, 1 Mb Flash.
snickerdoodle Xilinx Zynq 7010 28K $95 Yes Xilinx Zynq 7-Series SoC - ARM Cortex-A9 processor, and Artix-7 FPGA. 125 IO pins. 1GB DDR2 RAM. Texas Instruments WiLink 8 wireless module for 802.11n Wi-Fi and Bluetooth 4.1. No LEDs or buttons, but easy to wire up your own on a breadboard. If you want to use a baseboard, you'll need a snickerdoodle black ($195) with the pins in the "down" orientation. (E.g. The "breakyBreaky breakout board" ($49) or piSmasher SBC ($195)). The snickerdoodle one only comes with pins in the "up" orientation and doesn't support any baseboards. But you can still plug the jumpers into the pins and wire up things on a breadboard.
numato Mimas A7 Xilinx Artix 7 52K $149 No 2Gb DDR3 RAM. Gigabit Ethernet. HDMI IN/OUT. 100MHz LVDS oscillator. 80 IOs. 7-segment display, LEDs, buttons. (Found in this Reddit thread.)
Ultra96 Xilinx Zynq UltraScale+ ZU3EG 154K $249 Yes Has one of the latest Xilinx SoCs. 2 GB (512M x32) LPDDR4 Memory. Wi-Fi / Bluetooth. Mini DisplayPort. 1x USB 3.0 type Micro-B, 2x USB 3.0 Type A. Audio I/O. Four user-controllable LEDs. No buttons and limited LEDs, but easy to wire up your own on a breadboard
Nexys A7-100T Xilinx Artix 7 15,850 $265 No . 128MiB DDR2 RAM. Ethernet port, PWM audio output, accelerometer, PDM microphone, microphone, etc. 16 switches, 16 LEDs. 7 segment displays. USB HID Host for mice, keyboards and memory sticks.
Zybo Z7-10 Xilinx Zynq 7010 17,600 $199 Yes Xilinx Zynq 7000 SoC (ARM Cortex-A9, 7-series FPGA.) 1 GB DDR3 RAM. A few switches, push buttons, and LEDs. USB and Ethernet. Audio in/out ports. HDMI source + sink with CEC. 8 Total Processor I/O, 40 Total FPGA I/O. Also a faster version for $299 (Zybo Z7-20).
Arty A7 Xilinx Artix 7 15K $119 No 256MB DDR3L. 10/100 Mbps Ethernet. A few switches, buttons, LEDs.
DE10-Standard (specs) Altera Cyclone V 110K $350 Yes Dual-core Cortex-A9 processor. Lots of buttons, LEDs, and other peripherals.
DE10-Nano Altera Cyclone V 110K $130 Yes Same as DE10-Standard, but not as many peripherals, buttons, LEDs, etc.

Winner:

icoBoard ($100). (Buy it here.)
The icoBoard plugs into a Raspberry Pi, so it's similar to having a SoC. The iCE40-HX8K chip comes with 7,680 LUTs (logic elements.) This means that after you learn the basics and create some simple circuits, you'll also have enough logic elements to run the VexRiscv soft-core CPU (the lightweight Murax SoC.)
The icoBoard also supports a huge range of pluggable pmod accessories:
You can pick whatever peripherals you're interested in, and buy some more in the future.
Every FPGA vendor keeps their bitstream format secret. (Here's a Hacker News discussion about it.) The iCE40-HX8K bitstream has been fully reverse engineered by Project IceStorm, and there is an open-source set of tools that can compile Verilog to iCE40 bitstream.
This means that you have the freedom to do some crazy experiments, like:
You don't really have the same freedom to explore these things with Xilinx or Altera FPGAs. (Especially asynchronous circuits.)

Links:

Second Place:

iCE40-HX8K Breakout Board ($49)

Third Place:

numato Mimas A7 ($149).
An excellent development board with a Xilinx Artix 7 FPGA, so you can play with a bigger / faster FPGA and run a full RISC-V soft-core with all the options enabled, and a much higher clock speed. (The iCE40 FPGAs are a bit slow and small.)
Note: I've changed my mind several times as I learned new things. Here's some of my previous thoughts.

What did I buy?

I ordered a iCE40-HX8K Breakout Board to try out the IceStorm open source tooling. (I would have ordered an icoBoard if I had found it earlier.) I also bought a numato Mimas A7 so that I could experiment with the Artix 7 FPGA and Xilinx software (Vivado Design Suite.)

Questions

What can I do with an FPGA? / How many LUTs do I need?

submitted by ndbroadbent to FPGA [link] [comments]

I’m thinking of running a Bitcoin full node but need a little advice please.

Hello,
I believe in the future of Bitcoin. I find the whole space exciting and have been accumulating small amounts of BTC for about a year now, pretty much during the bear market.
I only recently started really looking into how I can contribute to this space but can’t afford the expense of mining (I don’t have the funds for the equipment or the electricity).
However, I have a 1TB data plan at home but only average around 650GB per month of usage. So I’ve been looking into contributing to the Bitcoin network by running a full node.
My laptop is not an option, but I’ve read I can run a full node using a Raspberry Pi and as I’m not very techy, actually I’m not techy at all, I’m looking for a little advice.
  1. If I were to purchase a Raspberry Pi kit, considering my level of technical knowledge, how likely is it that I could setup a full node at home?
  2. Does the node need regular maintenance? Or does it more or less just do its thing once it’s setup?
  3. I am accumulating my BTC on my Ledger Nano S. Can I keep using my hardware wallet and just run a node separately? Or should I use the node as my wallet?
Thank you for any help you may be able to offer!
submitted by Choyna to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

if you think the 21inc bitcoin computer is a waste of money because of ROI, i believe you're missing the point

i keep seeing posts about people being upset because they can't understand why someone would pay $400 for a raspberry pi with a mining shield, a big ass heatsink, and a fan. this isn't marketed as a bitcoin mining device. it's being marketed as a device (a dev kit for future devices, at this point) that is designed to integrate with bitcoin in many ways. mining is one (and definitely not the only one) of the ways it does that. and it's not mining to just be mining.
i'm not super familiar with the ins and outs of this newfangled device, but it seems to me like the satoshis are for other uses, like smart contract kinds of uses. the things are definitely not mining for profit.
i don't get everyone's obsession with ROI. would you be considering the ROI if you were investing in any other computer? obviously a computer is an investment, but the value you get out of it is from its utility. you can do all kinds of crazy cool shit with a computer. things you never imagined you could do before. i recently got a raspberry pi, and the uses seem endless. i never thought i would be learning about linux, coding, web design, electronics, robotics, music, web servers, home servers, proxys, radio, graphic design, and home automation, all because of the same little device! i don't see anything keeping this 21inc device from being a great tool for bitcoin innovation on many levels. and it seems they're just getting started.
it also seems to me like 21inc will eventually have a very decentralized mining pool. plus, the existence of another mining pool adds decentralization to bitcoin mining in general. right?
perhaps someone who is more knowledgeable could elaborate or cmv?
tl;dr the 21 inc computer is not a mining rig. it's a computer. it does stuff. some people find value in that.
submitted by ringlocksmith to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

The 8 most informative comments about 21inc's bitcoin computer dev kit

"Anyone who thinks this is about making money by mining has very little insight into what Bitcoin actually offers the world. This is not about bringing the old economy (banks, businesses, governments) into the Bitcoin family. This is about building entirely new economies, ones that have never and could never have existed before. 21inc can see the vision and they just bootstrapped the IoT on the Bitcoin blockchain. Thank your lucky stars on your way to the moon." - PhiMinD
"I'm fairly sure this is NOT an end user device. This device appears to be solely for the purpose of prototyping integration with other devices, and allow people to work out the ends and outs of the process. My assumption is that in like 6 months to a year, a much more compact and integrated device will be released that would be far cheaper, and suitable for installation in actual consumer devices. This is for developers." - DakotaChiliBeans
"The more I think about it, the more incredible and groundbreaking this seems. When every piece of hardware and software has the ability to transfer money, our entire concept of how we do everything changes. We're only beginning to imagine the possibilities. Even the few simple ones I've been thinking of make my head spin. Bitcoin as a human currency is exciting. Creates a more open system, breaks monopoly, gives you the option of true, non-revocable ownership. All great stuff. But it's these revolutionary ideas that make me believe that Bitcoin, or a successor very much like it, will take over the world. As someone invested in bitcoin, I'd like to see it succeed and my investment pay off, but goddamn will this be an exciting ride regardless. At this point, I'm seriously thinking of buying and developing on it. The potential here is lightyears beyond what most people are thinking." - consideranon
"Seeing the 21 Bitcoin computer reminds me of the developer kits for oculus rift. It took a lot of time to perfect before going fully public. It was also tested with a pre-release through Samsung's VR headset. Other more resourceful people bought the cardboard much like the same people would buy the Raspberry Pi instead of this. Anyway, the 21 computer is very likely the first iteration of many." - Hiro_Y3
"I think it removes a step in the process. Instead of learning about wallets, private keys, maintaining a login and password, etc, the computer takes care of all of that without the user having to think about any of it. The mining function provides initial liquidity to get the ball rolling. This is the first step of payments being built into the IoT." -TDBit
"Most of everybody here is missing the point. This is a bitcoin computer. This is not made to simply mine to generate a profit but rather a miner is just an added part. The miner is used to continuously supply the Bitcoin computer with bitcoin. It uses the bitcoin to "write" to the blockchain. It's like a digital quill with an endless bitcoin inkwell." -Fuzzypickles69
"Ok, this takes a leap of faith, but what they're trying to do is build a full-stack device which can send/receive bitcoin and which also solves the "how do devices get bitcoin in the first place" problem. Imagine the whole thing being a lot smaller and cheaper, and embedded in lots of devices globally. Now you have a world in which millions of devices (machines) can send and receive tiny payments, and which natively have a currency unit to use for that purpose." - melbustus
"ServiceXYZ: Links your 21 box to your Twitter account, and any paywall website lets you read anything you want without popups, ads, or subscriptions. There, I just made up a business in 10 seconds, someone go make it :)" - evoorhees
These comments were pointed to by balaji himself, here.. https://www.reddit.com/Bitcoin/comments/3lv6zj/ama_request_ceo_of_21inc_balaji_srinivasan/cv9zq9q
submitted by phieziu to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: After Butterfly Labs collapses, engineers find new jobs at 21 Inc.

BEGIN BLOG POST

After Butterfly Labs collapses, engineers find new jobs at 21 Inc.

A bitcoin miner has shipped on time. Yes, that is news. A new venture-capital backed company, 21 Inc., has released a miniature bitcoin miner that they call a "Bitcoin computer". For $399.99, you get a Raspberry Pi, an SHA-256 ASIC board, and a giant fan.
Again, this is news: normally, a manufacturer of bitcoin miners would overdesign and underengineer their equipment, or, if they managed to ship something functional, it would be so poorly engineered -- and over budget -- that it be an explosion waiting to happen and/or priced comparably to a four-door sedan.
21 Inc. has done something remarkable in the Bitcoin world: they started a company that operates like a legitimate business. They're even listed on Amazon.com, a company that's so strict with vendors that Nintendo was kicked off their system for not kissing enough customer ass.
Okay, enough with the praise.

This thing sucks.

The 21.co "computer" certainly deserves a place in the VC world, along with the other products consisting of wild promises and inane use cases. For the price of 4 Raspberry Pi computer kits, you get the following:
(If you have a remote desire to develop applications that use bitcoin, stop here. Go through that list and buy just those items above. You don't need anything else. If you're looking for comedy, or if you're a sucker with too much money, read on...)

Is that all I get for my money?

Those products alone don't allow you to make Bitcoin applications, apparently. You need these things, too:

How about the software demos?

It's difficult to justify developing a $400 computer that can't do much. So, to entice some customers, 21 Inc. included demos that try really hard to make customers feel inspired. Here are just a few things that 21 Inc. claims were totally impossible before their product existed:

What are the real customers saying?

The packaging is slick:
"This @21dotco computer came already opened..."
The hardware is reliable:
"...it must have lost power, which caused my SSH keys to become corrupted."
The software is revolutionary:
"...it will be more expensive to pay for your spotify subscription via your electricity bill, but a lot of people don't care."

I want to buy it anyway!

Go ahead. I won't stop you. Oh, and 21 Inc. doesn't accept bitcoins.
END BLOG POST
submitted by theirmoss to Buttcoin [link] [comments]

Is this enough to try mining?

Total newb here. I'd like to try mining just to get some experience with the basics. Not interested in trying to make a fortune but would like to at least get a sitoshi every once in a while. Would the following hardware be sufficient to me get up and join a mining pool?
GekkoScience Compac USB Stick Bitcoin Miner 8gh/s+ (BM1384) https://www.amazon.com/dp/B016CWBYJK/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_s4mOzb79S8JH5
Raspberry PI 3 Model B 1.2GHz 64-bit quad-core ARMv8 CPU, 1GB RAM https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01CD5VC92/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_15mOzbA8TX7VR
Samsung 32GB 95MB/s (U1) MicroSD EVO Select Memory Card with Adapter (MB-ME32GA/AM) https://www.amazon.com/dp/B06XWN9Q99/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_t6mOzb4D3AZHN
CanaKit 5V 2.5A Raspberry Pi 3 Power Supply / Adapter / Charger (UL Listed) https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MARDJZ4/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_.6mOzbAT18HG4
submitted by wisaunders to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

$30 or so RPi Starting Pack for Bitcoin Mining

I'm not talking about this starter kit; rather, I'm talking about laying the groundwork for some light Bitcoin mining using a RPi Model B.
Block erupters aside, I wanted to buy a Pi and some other things for around $30 that has:
I don't know a whole lot about RPi or BTC, but I think that this list is a good one.
Short post shorter, I need your help on deciding what to buy. When the stuff comes in doesn't really matter. Just tell me what I could add, change, or remove from the list to make it better for mining. Thanks!
submitted by SteelbiteGaming to raspberry_pi [link] [comments]

Thinking about buying into a MegaBigPower ASIC kit. Any thoughts?

https://megabigpower.com/shop/index.php?route=product/product&path=59&product_id=70
It has been awhile since I've been actively looking at bitcoin mining. This seems to be the best short term (next 6 months) option for building some capital to further expand a personal mining operation.
What are your opinions on the matter?
Here are some of the numbers I've run:
Bitcoin value. Current value at ~1000 USD. Profits above calculated at 900 USD Bitcoin difficulty: 1,180,923,195 Bitcoins per Block (BTC/block): 25 Conversion rate (USD/BTC): 900 Hash rate: 100 GH/s Electricity rate (USD/kWh): 0.09 Power consumption (W): 3 Time frame (months): 3 Cost of mining hardware (USD): 3011.98 Profitability decline per year: 0.61 Difficulty 1,180,923,195.00 Mining Factor 100: 0.04 USD/[email protected]/s Hardware break even: 84 days Net profit first time frame: 279.64 USD Coins per 24h at these conditions: 0.0426 BTC Power cost per 24h: 0.01 USD Revenue per day: 38.33 USD Less power costs: 38.32 USD System efficiency: 33333.33 MH/s/W Mining Factor 100 at the end of the time frame: 0.03 USD/[email protected]/s Average Mining Factor 100: 0.04 USD/[email protected]/s Power cost per time frame: 0.59 USD Revenue per time frame: 3292.21 USD Less power costs: 3291.62 USD Hardware Cost Breakdown: 100GH Overclockable Bitcoin Miner Kit 2,800.00 USD https://megabigpower.com/shop/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=70 RASPBERRY PI MODEL B 700Mhz; 512Mb RAM 41.99 USD http://www.amazon.com/RASPBERRY-MODEL-700Mhz-512Mb-RAM/dp/B009SQQF9C/ref=sr_1_1?s=pc&ie=UTF8&qid=1389015864&sr=1-1 Cooler Master Silent Pro Gold 800W 169.99 USD http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817171057 Whatever amount you want to invest determines your percentage of the profits. Example: Total Investment Cost: 3011.98 USD Investor #1: 75 USD = %2.4 Profit Share, net profit of 6.97 USD after 3 months Investor #2: 500 USD = %16.6 Profit Share, net profit of 46.50 USD after 3 months Investor #3: 906.60 USD = %30.1 Profit Share Investor #4: 1505.99 USD = %50 Profit Share 874.16 USD net profit after 3 months with a $800 investment. Mining pool fee. Typically 3%. P2Pool offers 0% mining pool fee. https://github.com/forrestv/p2pool 
submitted by GallopingGeese to BitcoinMining [link] [comments]

Looking for a beginner hobby project: Is a Raspberry Pi controlled ASICMiner Block Erupter USB array worth my time?

Hello! I've been wanting to get involved with bitcoin mining for a while and thought that bitcoin black friday was a great time to take the plunge and order some hardware.
I don't have the money to invest in hardware that would actually provide a net profit, but that's not really important as I'm interested in getting involved as a hobby project.
I recently came across this PiMiner Raspberry Pi Bitcoin Miner kit/tutorial and it looks quite interesting. My question for you guys is if you've had any experience or know of any flaws with this setup or even if this is so outdated now so as to render it useless as a miner. I suppose the big unknown for me in this setup is the ASICMiner Block Erupter USB devices.
Is there a better mining hobby setup available in the same kind of price range? Would the raspberry pi controller work with a better alternate USB ASIC miner?
Thanks for taking the time to help me get started with this hobby!
submitted by psi4 to BitcoinMining [link] [comments]

Starting with Bitcoin... What Should I Use?

Hello there! I really wanted to start bitcoin mining for a while now, but everything was very expensive. Now, like 5 months later, Prices have dropped. I wanted to know if this would be good. I entered this into a profit calculator as well, so no need to say how much I will earn, just if you think it will be a good stater-ish kit...
4-5 USB ASIC Miners .335 G/hash roughly 16 bucks 1-2 USB ASIC Bitfury or Some Other clocking in at 1.7-2 G/Hash. Roughly 40-60 bucks 1 10 slot usb hub, powered of course. 10 ish bucks (Depends on how lucky I get!) 1 Cooling Fan For about 10 bucks as well. 1 Raspberry PI (Own It <3 ) Possibly a 10 G/hash miner box from Butterfly,but not to sure until I feel how mining goes...
That is about it. Now before you guys go and scorn me about, "Hey, noob, learn everything first, go spend 3k before you get Serious!", I really don't care about profit ATM... I just want to get the experience in. I would also like some crypto currency just in case it gets REALLY popular. Kind of like a investment. Well, what else do you think? With the Fan , Usb Hub ( Possibly Smaller for now) And 4-5 of the .335, that should churn out .16 cents a day. 222 days later XD... But I would really like to get along with this. Any other advice or a comment, feel free to put it under! Have a nice day and happy mining!
submitted by Zvight to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Would this rig be any good and is it compatible?

I am building a rig and want to know whether it is compatible with Dogecoin mining and if it is any good for the money spent, here are all the parts: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Raspberry-Pi-B-Starter-Kit/dp/B00LU2FDG8/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1416947716&sr=8-2&keywords=raspberry+pi I am using a pi because it is cheap and does not require much power to sue
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Bitcoin-Stick-bitshopper-NanoFury-NF2/dp/B00LOA8TIA/ref=sr_1_6?ie=UTF8&qid=1416947614&sr=8-6&keywords=fury+miner I saw this and it was running at 6.6ghs, looked at some reviews and saw it was pretty good, but is it compatible?(I know it's got Bitcoin in the name but it is ASIC and I think Dogecoin is ASIC )
http://www.amazon.co.uk/USB-Laptop-Desktop-Fan-Flexible/dp/B0012INYTS/ref=sr_1_7?ie=UTF8&qid=1416947746&sr=8-7&keywords=usb+fan Fan to keep it cool(might get 2)
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Premium-Expansion-Splitter-NoteBook-Supports/dp/B0070Y9XPW/ref=sr_1_9?ie=UTF8&qid=1416947805&sr=8-9&keywords=usb+hub And a hub to keep it all together and for future expansion
Is it all compatible with Dogecoin mining and if so is it any good
Thanks
Edit: What type of miner would Dogecoin use(like ASIC, Scrypt etc.)
submitted by Tunt__Cunt to dogecoin [link] [comments]

[Table] IamA founder of Tindie, "Etsy for Tech". Started on /r/Arduino, team of 5, just finished fundraising (pitching 50+ investors), and have now closed $1m+ in funding. This is a follow up to last year's AMA, for anyone interested in startups/tech/Silicon Valley/open hardware. AMA!

Verified? (This bot cannot verify AMAs just yet)
Date: 2013-12-02
Link to submission (Has self-text)
Questions Answers
As a maker, why should I sell my goods on your site instead of amazon? As a buyer, why should I buy from you instead of amazon/ebay? Great questions - as a maker, our rates are lower than Amazon - flat 5% of the order. We also reach a core audience of people like you, which tends to mean you'll sell more on Tindie vs Amazon. As an example, one seller sold exclusively on Amazon, opened a Tindie store, and we began out selling Amazon. He closed his Amazon store and now sells exclusively on Tindie.
As a buyer, you are joining a community of likeminded people from all over the world and in different niches. Some like audio, some drones, others lighting. In the new year we are launching more features to build out the community side of the site. We are a community marketplace - community comes first. We can do a better job on the community side, and those features are currently being built.
As an example, one seller sold exclusively on Amazon, opened a Tindie store, and we began out selling Amazon. He closed his Amazon store and now sells exclusively on Tindie. Amazon has a flat fee you must pay $40 a month When you sell out many times over, inventory management becomes a huge issue.
Many reasons but here are two- * * Amazon has a flat fee you must pay $40 a month.* Easier inventory management when you have to just make sure 1 site is right vs multiple. When you sell out many times over, inventory management becomes a huge issue. But, that's three reasons. How can you run a successful business if you can't even count? Link to static.fjcdn.com
I have a desire to learn a programming language and have messed around with python and java on codeacademy. What would you recommend as the next step? Books? More beginner tutorials? Poking around on github? Sounds like you are now at the crossroad where people either keep going, or 'never have the time.' When I started, I'd get the occasional comment online, 'You'll never figure it out.' It's a pretty accurate statement for most. Most don't figure it out. If you can put your head down and just grit it out, you'll get to the other side.
If you want to grit it out, start with Learn Python the Hard Way. Then figure out a project you want to build and go build it. You'll pick things up as you go. You'll think you have it about 10 times before you really have a solid understanding. There were many times I'd talk to my friends and say "Oh I figured it out." I was wrong 10 times :)
It took 1 year to get to n00b level. The next year is when things settle in. After 2 years, you'll have a solid foundation to keep honing your skills. You won't know everything, but you can hack together projects, & figure things out.
Also checkout Stackoverflow. Learning how to properly break down my problems into questions was a great exercise. It helped me understand what the real problem is vs what I thought it was.
Did you eventually start working as an engineer or was programming geared towards side projects and building Tindie? I did - my first job after learning how to code was as a developer advocate. Not 'coding' but putting what I learned to good use. That company was acquired, and I eventually became a web engineer at the company which acquired us. That was my last job before starting Tindie.
My local hackerspace, a 501(c)3, is just getting started. We're thinking of making some products to generate some funding... would Tindie be the right marketplace for us? Oh cool! Yep! We have members of hackspaces all over the globe on Tindie. Sounds like a perfect fit. If you have any questions, just pm me and we can help!
What sort of things did you do for market validation? Good question - the only market validation I did was ask the question on /Arduino. There wasn't a marketplace for this type of hardware (we are still the only "big" site doing what we are doing). The space is emerging now.
Did you have personal experience with this type of thing, people you knew who needed something like this, or some other type of research? You are right. The big question I got from investors is actually - 'How big is the market?' Unfortunately there isn't a good answer for that bc the market is growing / being defined now. Arduino/Raspberry Pi/Drones/3D printers are all just getting started and all growing like weeds. If those platforms become as big as we think they will, then a site like Tindie will have to emerge.
Also, how do you go about estimating market potential? The one thing we look at is the components market is a massive, multibillion dollar market. The type of components that are on Tindie, generally speaking, first come to market on Tindie. The market potential is entirely untapped. However having orders from gov't agencies & large businesses is very reassuring that there is a much greater opportunity than just hobbyists (which is what most people thing on first glance).
What's been your biggest challenge as CEO of your own start-up? Great questions -
What's the most frequent challenge you saw when working across various start-ups in the Valley? Biggest Challenge as CEO - Communication, balancing expectations, keeping everyone on the same page from users, employees to investors. You'll constantly hear, "Did you see X?" when someone thinks it is a competitor. Chances are it isn't and they have their own idea of what the business is which is different than your own.
What words of wisdom do you have for someone wanting to create their own start-up? Wisdom to start a startup - If it is a tech startup, one of your cofounders must be technical. Either yourself or your cofounder. If you can't build the first version/ a proof of concept yourself, start there. If you aren't technical, and don't know anyone technical, learn. In the valley you hear, "I'm looking for a techincal cofounder." so many times its crazy. You either already know someone (a good friend usually) or you don't. Trust me , you won't 'find' a techincal cofounder.
Thanks for your time (and sorry for all of the questions) No worries - these were excellent questions. Keep 'em coming!
You'd be shocked how many random emails I get with businesses proposals. Are these the recreate facebook type of deals where you do all the work and they get to be the owner for giving you the idea of facebook? It runs the gamut from sales, hiring, marketing, partnerships, you name it.
Did you have a good breakfast? Eh, coffee, leftovers, and IRC. We have a channel on Freenode I hop in every morning to check in with users (Tindarians) and make sure everything is right with the world.
(hash)tindie on Freenode ftw
You've mentioned a few times how you shouldn't outsource development to a third party. Can you elaborate on this? Why not? What was your experience? What should you do instead if you're a n00b coder (like myself)? Sure thing - if you hire a 3rd party, you will always have to pay someone else to iterate on the site. There is a 0% chance it will be right on the first shot. Therefore its really an invitation to spend a lot of money down the road - not just the upfront cost you are spending to get your idea made. This is what I did with Knowble - it cost something like $20k+. Please learn from my mistake :) You'll have to iterate, make changes, learn as you go. If you know how to code, then you can make those changes yourself. You'll do it in the morning/nights/weekends and it will only cost you your time.
What advice do you have for me as a student? Thank you, I think what you're doing is awesome! Very cool! Getting press / outside attention is very difficult (if you don't pay for PR - we don't pay for PR). Write blog posts, like to those sites. The link love will go a long way (over time). Most of the companies that you read about on TechCrunch, PandoDaily, etc are paying for PR which is why they get listed on all of those blogs and have stories come out at the same time (embargoes). As a student, build something! Just keep building things. You have some free time - take full advantage of it. Also meet your peers. Build a network of other students in your class. Some will go to Google, Twitter, the next Google, the next Twitter. Increase your chances of doing well by meeting as many super smart people as you can. Build projects with them. Just make things and learn from experience.
I'm also a CS student and for the longest time I've been interested in Arduino. How did you get started tinkering and where would you recommend someone such as myself begin so as to eventually purchase from your website? There are tons of beginner Arduino books. Arduino also has some great tutorials: Link to arduino.cc
In this age, if you have a CS background, Google is your friend :)
Did some more reading. I personally feel a lot of excitement for how well you're doing lol, congrats! What we're you doing before the 5 year run in the valley? How did you get started there? Learn to do the things you don't know yourself.
NEVER outsource development to a 3rd party company.
Learn how to code.
If you don't know how to code, don't bring on another person that doesn't know how to code.
So what compelled you to go from NC to CA? How did you start getting acquainted with people there? Joined Yelp. Yelp was maybe 40-50 people at that point. Flew myself for the interview, got the job, packed my car and hit the road.
As an aspiring entrepreneur myself, my question is this: what was the process like of getting the company from an idea to something you would be able to pitch to investors? The site was already live, we had products, orders, traffic. The sales early on were ~doubling month over month. Sure they were small but that seems like a very good sign. As it kept growing, people around me connected me with other people interested in the space. The first investor I got was someone that was in my network already, but I didn't know him. He also invests in early stage companies, understands marketplaces, and believes in the changes we are seeing in the hardware space. From introductory call to email saying, "I'd like to invest" was about 12 - 18 hours.
How did you fund the project initially? Spend time/money to get a VERY polished pitch deck.
How did you go about finding investors? If an investor says "stay in touch, I'm interested" thats a No.
Did you have to refine or iterate your idea at all in the process? We didn't have to iterate on the site, but I did iterate on the messaging/how I frame what we are doing depending upon the investor, and how that message was received by the last investor. I was constantly iterating what I said from pitch to pitch.
Would you feel that taking a year off to learn python was a worthwhile decision? With no coding background, can I learn it in a year? Definitely - 100% worthwile. I had saved up enough to live for a year without a paycheck (without healthcare...not smart but I did it). If you are interested, go for it. While you still have a job start learning HTML, CSS, some basic things. Give yourself some sort of foundation before taking the plunge. After a year won't be able to get a job as an engineer, but it will definitely help in the long run. I have never regretted that decision.
Any recommendations on resources to learn HTML and CSS? I have some programming skills (C, assembly, VHDL) and found the code academy stuff to be too slow and had a hard time seeing how to really apply it. Link to webdesign.tutsplus.com
I <3 Tuts / Envato.
How much did a year of free time cost you? Rent was $710 a month, Food ~$200-300. Add in taxes & other spending. $20k ish.
There are many exciting developments in hobby-level electronics development. First things like Arduino, now affordable ARM processors. In addition to cheap accelerometers, laser cutting for enclosures, 3d printing, etc. What trends and fads are you seeing that are exciting to you? What kind of products do you think we will see in Tindie next year? Five years from now? Ten? AirPi - Two 17yr olds in London built a shield for Raspberry Pi to turn it into a weather station. Brilliant, cheap product that I never saw coming and has done amazingly. They had to incorporate in the UK, take a loan from their parents, and just shipped hundreds of preorders they got on Tindie. The only thing I know for certain is we will have tens of thousands of hardware companies emerge over the next few years because it is becoming cheaper to prototype and easier to manufacture in lower volumes. Yes "hardware is hard" but it is getting easier and that only opens the door for more people to come in.
Tapster - a robot for manual app testing on mobile devices. EVERY mobile app developer in the world should have one bc of the time you'll save.
How did you come up with the name Tindie? Indie Tech...Tech Indie... Tindie.
The domain was available. Best $7 I've spent.
Amazing site! Just found it. Question/Suggestion ... I'm looking for a site that will accept commissions for one-off projects based on boards like Arduino or Raspberry. Any chance you're site will offer such a market? Thanks! Can you break down "will accept commissions?" Just want to make sure I fully understand what you are looking for.
Hi there. I have been looking into creating a website my self, and I was just curious as to how you build a user base for something like this? How did you get people to sell on Tindie when it first began? Good question - you'll need to figure out where your initial users are and tell them what you are doing. Get people in your corner. As you build the site, give them updates, let them sign up before the site is live. If you don't have enough users on day 1, do more to drive more users to the site. Launch only when you have some amount of users (few hundred or maybe a few thousand is the best case scenario). You'll never be ready to launch but definitely give yourself some momentum before opening the doors.
I did this by keeping everyone on /Arduino in the loop. As I found a name, a domain, logo, I'd share those updates. Sellers were able to sign up and "stock the shelves" prior to launch which meant once I opened the site for transactions, we had ~20 sellers/ products on the site and orders on day 1.
Have you considered reaching out to the Bitcoin mining community? Their hardware seems to fit into your site. We haven't but I'm 100% open to Bitcoin mining products on the site.
Have you considered accepting Bitcoin? We haven't due to its volatility.
Who is your favorite ninja turtle? Easy one - Michelangelo!
Do you plan on taking currencies like bitcoin, megacoin, etc? Not right now. Bitcoin is too volatile. From talking with other marketplaces that implemented Bitcoin, the % of transactions that come through are very, very small. Most people seem to be holding Bitcoins as an investment strategy (the gold analogy). I think that is true. At this point, we can get a much bigger bang for our engineering buck by working on other features vs implementing/maintaing Bitcoin or a similar digital currency.
Why did you decide to go to the valley for this? For someone thinking of starting an e-shop startup, what would you advise? I had been in SF for 4 years, then moved to Portland after the last company I was at was acquired. I moved back bc missed friends and our head of engineering is in Mountain View too. Made sense from a personal perspective.
Would I move to the valley if I didn't already have a connection to the area? I'm not sure. It is definitely cheaper to live somewhere else. However it is more difficult to get into the community from outside the area. If you live in the the valley, you'll constantly hear about startups/tech and meet people who are part of the scene. It's easier to be a part of the conversation if you are in the area.
I've heard from many of my friends in the industry that moving to SF is also a risk as many of the big companies pose a risk at hiring your engineers. Many of them end up moving their companies back to Canada where Engineers are much cheaper for the same quality. Very true. It is very common for people to stay at a job for one year, vest 25% of your options, and leave for the next hot startup. It is valuable to have a presence in the valley - but not necessary for your team to all be there. I'm a huge fan of distributed businesses.
So what's your take on the interest level in hardware overall? Do you think things being sold on the site will continue to increase in complexity? Or will they be limited in scope and cost in the future because people are more interested in the low end of things? Hey Chris! I think it will gain in complexity - esp as parts come down in price, and manufacturing lower quantities becomes more accessible. The opportunities only get magnified as those two trends accelerate.
I think we will always have low level / low end products, but the sky is the limit - in terms of price point and customers. We already have products that cost pennies to $1k+. We will begin to have more consumerish products - but I think those will fuel growth in hardware. The more interesting products emerge, the more interested people will jump into diy. Very cyclical. Arduino & Raspberry Pi just make that first step so much easier. Gateway hardware drugs.
This looks awesome, I'm surprised I've never heard of it. My question: how hard is it really to start your own business and what are some obstacles no one hears about? It is difficult but not impossible. Things to plan for: taxes & attorney fees. You'll want to set up your business correctly if you plan on raising outside investment. If you don't do that right up front, you'll get bit when you fundraise. The legal fees we'll have for this financing round will be over $10k I bet (probably more)
Any suggestions on where to find and learn how to do this hardware stuff? Where did you learn to it? Was there any doubt while creating this project? Did you think about giving up? Google is your best friend. There are books, tutorials, but just dive in. If you have some coding background just get started. Fortunately that is where I started so its more a process of picking something up and playing around (vs starting from 0).
Question: how much equity did you give up for the investment you've gained? Thanks! A this point it is just closing and collecting checks so the final % will be set in a few weeks once we have a definitive amount closed with this round. However the answer you are looking for is 20%-25%.
I have a question. What stage was Tindie in when you pitched to the investors? (users/revenue) What was is about Tindie that made them decide to invest? At this time last year, I forget where we were with users but we had $3600 in sales that month which would be about 100 orders. When talking to early stage investors, it is very much a gamble. The chance of failure much higher, but then again the opportunity is great. I haven't asked them point blank, but I think it ultimately boils down to they have an idea of how the world will work in the future, and you fit in that narrative.
I have a very refined idea for a web/mobile app start up. I have done months of research on the problem/solution I am building but I have no experience designing websites. Thus, I will need to pitch investors to fund development. What are any tips or resources to get in touch with potential investors? Unfortunately you need to get it built. With out a product & traction, it will be very tough sailing
Do you accept Bitcoin and if not can we expect it in the future? We don't right now and don't have any plans to in the future. Copying answer from another question "Bitcoin is too volatile. From talking with other marketplaces that implemented Bitcoin, the % of transactions that come through are very, very small. Most people seem to be holding Bitcoins as an investment strategy (the gold analogy). I think that is true. At this point, we can get a much bigger bang for our engineering buck by working on other features vs implementing/maintaing Bitcoin or a similar digital currency."
I'm an idea guy; I have new ideas everyday and am actually executing a few of them. My roadblock right now is getting it out there and selling it (to consumers, to investors). I have a new idea that, while the product is different than yours, could rope in every business sector. I've never built a business model; all of my stuff is from the idea point of view. I get an idea, find out if it's been done, and then make it work. What can I do to get the word out there and find investors? What kind of cut do you think is fair for investors? Build it. Unfortunately "ideas are cheap." You have to build it before anything else.
We are a startup who has built it (4+ years of work). Its a business administration product. We are in desperate need of sales and marketing department. How do we approach investors? If you are growing like a weed, they should be approaching you (at least some should). Based on the tone of your question, it sounds like that may not be the case?
As a maker who is currently in final stages of getting a product ready (ie 2nd round of PCB prototypes) any advice about how I go about getting it ready to sell on tindie? How do I determine a good initial batch size to order, handle shipping, refunds etc? Good question - once you are ready, you can list it as a Fundraiser (our version of crowfunding which really is just accepting preorders). It has to hit the min # of units sold to 'live' where we bill the orders and you fulfill those ordered. That will give you a good idea of the initial demand. Shipping & handling you'll need to do a little testing on your end bc it depends where you are located & the shipping service you select. Refunds we can handle on our end. You'll just need to tell us which orders to refund. If you have any other questions, feel free to email us at support(at) tindie.com. More than happy to help!
How did you get in front of 50 investors? Thanks for the AMA I kind of see now what I need to do for my Start Up getting rejected 10 times shouldn't be a big deal I guess. 100% from networking. Friend introducing me to someone else, who says you should talk to X. That person sends the intro, and then schedule a meeting. Cold emails don't get you very far with the top investors who are constantly being bombarded with pitches.
This is very interesting. How is the actual pitching process? I mean, once you get introduced, do you pitch to them in a Shark Tank style? over coffee/lunch? And which aspects of Tindie was the biggest seller to the investors? My background.
How did you come up with the idea.
Why now?
What are you doing?
Traction.
Future plans.
The team.
Some were more presentation style with a slideshow and just run through the deck where the investor most likely will interrupt you from time to time with questions on your points/assumptions.
0 were like Shark Tank.
I think the main thing we have going for us is our team -very strong with startup experience at well known companies/ great engineers. Next is our traction and position in the space.
Thanks for the answer! I thought you were a one man team before getting some funding. How did you get a team together when nothing was really proven? Ah at that point it was just myself and I had built everything up until that point. The site was live, we had products, orders, early traction.
of all congrats on the success with your start up and initial funding. What is the number one thing you would say investors look for in a start up? What helped you achieve success while pitching your ideas? Depends ultimately on the investor and if they are the lead or a follow on investor. The lead must believe in the space, have some idea of what is going, and therefore be passionate about the opportunity.
Follow on investors might know something about the space, might not. The one thing I didn't realize is how much they just "pile on." Most investors look for a signal by another big name investor, and if they are investing, looks good and they want in! The pile on mentality is alive and well.
So are you saying that funding is closed and you are not accepting any new investors? Right - the round is closed. The docs are written. The lead investors have already wired their funds. Now just emailing the smaller investors, getting signatures and the wires for their commitments.
1.) What was the toughest question you were asked during pitches? 2.) Any questions worth mentioning a company should be able to answer that they don't think about? 2) I don't think there is any particular question - just think ahead of what they will ask you. Have your questions down cold. Answer & then shut up. Don't be afraid of silence.
3.) Our products are similar in the sense of the needed co-creation so I'm interested in your marketing strategy on both fronts. (finding sellers and finding buyers) 3) Sellers & Customers has been word of mouth. We haven't don't much on the direct marketing side, so I don't have very good advice on that.
4.) I'm sure not everyone has been full time with the company, so how did you manage a team of 5 part-timers and making sure deadlines were met, goals accomplished, etc.? 1) Market size. There isn't a good answer. You can come up with many different answers with many different data points but at the end of the day, no one knows 4) Everyone is full -time.
I'm trying to convince some friends of mine to get serious about taking an idea of there's to an angel to see if they (we) could get funding. So my question is, what did you need to take to investors in the form of demos/research/etc. to get them to take you seriously enough to give you your first (and subsequent) rounds of funding? Build it first. If you get traction on the idea/project, investors will be interested. If it is just an idea, you'll have a very tough time. The only real answer - build it and they will come (if it is a great project and they see potential).
Makers / producers of open source hardware and products? What niche do you feel is currently not being addressed in the open source hardware arena? I think any hardware product today should have an open equivalent. The opportunity is just sitting there for someone to build an open version of X. Open source if a flywheel. Once you get it started and there is a community to support it, it only becomes stronger and better. At the end of the day, I don't see much difference btwn producer vs educator. If you have an open project, part of your job will be education. Just start working on something. At the end of the day, if you want to produce it and sell it you can. If not, no harm/no foul.
Hi Thank you for doing this. My question is, how hard it is to work with VC/Angel people? Do they push you really hard? Good question - some investors you won't get along with. You'll have different ideas/ look at the world differently/ it just isn't a fit. If that is the case, probably not a good fit as a major investor in your company. The can email you rather frequently - don't want to hate that part of your job...
I'm 19 and have no marketable skills beyond being the designated local tech geek. In terms of coding, I could mess around with the variables in JavaScript, but that's about it. Would I have any use in your organization? If not, what would you recommend the first thing I do to set down that path? Unfortunately not. Get more experienced & become a solid JS developer. Build projects, open the code, get feedback, critiqued by the JS community. You'll have a lot of value as a seasoned JS dev (esp as Node picks up traction)
I'd love to hear your thoughts on patents for DIY hardware! Let's say I've got a hardware design idea, but I know it's an evolution of existing technology. How do I go about researching conflicting patents that could prevent me from bringing my idea to market, what steps should I take to differentiate my idea from similar products, and at what point (if any) do I need to see an attorney? I'm anti-patent. It is a huge time/money suck and ultimately hinders innovation. I'm not the best person to ask on researching your design/idea/ etc but I'd probably just go ahead build it and go for it. Any time you spend looking for conflicting patents, someone else will launch their version and get a leg up.
Plans for the international market? Already international! We have customers in over 60 countries, sellers in over 40. I haven't looked lately but those were the numbers about a month or two ago.
Thank you for shipping to India! \o/
Hello Tindie. I am just now incorporating as of January 1st (LLC) with friends in the tech industry for our first start-up. They are all NASA employees and MIT grads with extensive tech background, but my background is in Public Policy and Regulations development. Are there tools on your website for new start ups in the tech field, or could you offer any recommendations as to navigating pitfalls for someone without extensive tech background? We can definitely do a better job on that end. Since you all have an engineering background, most likely the biggest problem will come in execution - sourcing manufacturers, parts, work abroad vs a domestic manufacturer. PM me and we can definitely help!
What has been your biggest regret starting Tindie? No regrets so far. It's been a huge learning experience- esp this year. If I were still at my old job, I'd have been constantly wondering whether or not this could take off. Happy I took the plunge.
HAve you ever thought to add Music Tech to the site? I know a lot of people who are into buying and creating their own midi controllers/instruments. OR have I overlooked something? We have it :) Link to www.tindie.com
How many register sellers and buyers do you have? Sellers: Over 300.
Last updated: 2013-12-06 11:10 UTC
This post was generated by a robot! Send all complaints to epsy.
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4 GH/s Raspberry PI Bitcoin Miner - PiMiner - YouTube DIY Bitcoin Mining: Hardware (part1) - YouTube Raspberry Pi: Bitcoin mining - YouTube How to make a Raspberry Pi Bitcoin Mining Rig - YouTube Raspberry Pi 4 Bitcoin Mining For 24 Hours! - YouTube

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4 GH/s Raspberry PI Bitcoin Miner - PiMiner - YouTube

Here are the links for the programs- Zipeg- http://www.zipeg.com/ Win32 Disk Imager- https://sourceforge.net/projects/win32diskimager/ Advanced IP Scanner- h... In diesem Video wird gezeigt, wie Sie mit Ihrem Raspberry Pi nach Bitcoins "schürfen" können. Auf vielfachen Wunsch verlinken wir nun auf die von uns in dem ... Get an additional $10 in Bitcoins from Coinbase when purchasing through my referral link http://fredyen.com/get/Bitcoins Raspberry Pi: http://amzn.to/2l6yrW7... Buy Raspberry Pi 4 Model B 4GB: https://amzn.to/2tlBfGW How to Setup a Raspberry Pi 4 Bitcoin Mining Rig w/ Bitmain AntMiner U3: https://youtu.be/dPWTSytzN7g... Alexander J. Singleton provides a screencast for Raspberry Pi set-up and configuration introducing Bitcoin-mining as part-1 of a 2-series tutorial- please refer to the following GitHub-gist for ...

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